Meditation Challenges Do Occur from Time to Time

This is a guest post written by author Mike Matzuk:

While most of us have friends or acquaintances who meditate regularly and seem to benefit from it, meditation challenges often prevent many of us from giving it a try.  Those challenges could range from understanding the different types of meditation and choosing which is best for you, to figuring out when, where and how to receive instruction.  Money can also be a hurdle as some options have a substantial price tag associated with the road to enlightenment.  Or, as always, it might just be a case of pure procrastination or a lack of sufficient motivation.  Below is a summary of my decision making process.

Procrastination has been my primary meditation challenge.

But the multiple negative impacts of stress on my body have forced me to pursue change.  While medications worked for a while, they no longer allow me the quality of life that I desire.  So, where to start?  I researched different types of meditation online and noted which appealed to me.  The ones included on my list have all produced positive, documented medical changes in the body that resulted from practicing meditation.  These changes include, but are no way limited to, lower blood pressure and differences in the way the brain processes information, leading to reduced stress.

meditation challenges

So, which one to choose?  Transcendental Meditation appealed to me, but I removed it from my list as the average cost of training is around $1500.  That leaves me with Mindfulness, the type of mediation familiar to many, with it’s roots in Buddhism, and Heart Rhythm Meditation(HRM) developed by the folks at the Institute for Applied Meditation of the Heart(IAM).  Both have their appeal and, to my mind, similar goals and methods, which are to improve mental clarity by reducing clutter in your brain while focusing on something as simple and unique as how you breathe.  HRM comes across to me as a more direct, situation specific and proactive approach.  While Mindfulness can be learned minus the Buddhist trappings, with me not being a particularly spiritual person, and knowing that my primary motivation is immediate improvement in my health, HRM is the option I have chosen.

Now what?  First, I need a concrete reason for going forward.  Without sufficient motivation this effort will die on the vine.  In my case, it’s easy.  If I don’t find a way to reduce stress or train my body and mind to handle it better it’s going to kill me.  As for the how, when and where, there are a number of options appealing to most anyone.  You can enroll at IAM to take classes online, you can buy their book, buy a DVD, take classes for free via youtube or join a local HRM social group which I’ve seen for free or an optional donation.

So that’s how I overcame my meditation challenges.  Your route may be different and your results may differ, but if you have read this far your level of interest should be sufficient to get started.  Define your motivation, do some research, talk to friends, choose a path and take action.  Be firm in your commitment and dedicate a small part of each day to perfecting the methods you learn and you and the world around you will be better for it.

 

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About the Author ()

Rachel, the owner of Your Best Meditation.com, is a traveler, marketer, and lover of adventure. She started meditating a few years ago, while living in Brazil, and has REALLY enjoyed the benefits of meditation since then. With regular meditation, Rachel reports feeling more calm, at peace, relaxed… and having a greater sense of “knowing”. That being said, she doesn’t always remember to meditate… … and is working on practicing more often. She finds that guided meditations help a lot, though. It can be really difficult to get still yourself, so having someone point you in the direction you want to take is priceless. When not meditating, Rachel has several other passions. Her interests range from reading, traveling, belly dancing, psychology, yoga, Toastmasters, and everything in between.

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